7th Grade

7th Grade


Ready to make “Bill of Rights” Parody Videos with 7th Grade Performance Studies

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We have just finished two finished 2 phases of our 7th Grade “Bill of Rights” musical parodies unit where we take Social Studies content into Performance Studies.  After choosing popular songs to work with, we modified lyrics to demonstrate an understanding of amendments and used GarageBand to create an MP3 audio recording.

  • Phase 1 – Write a “Bill of Rights” Song that demonstrates your understanding of them
    • Choose a popular song with your assigned group
    • Created alternative lyrics on a Google Doc
    • Practiced Singing
  • Phase 2 – Create an MP3 audio recording in GarageBand
    • Learned how to record a layered track in Garage Band (1 layer instrumental and 1 layer audio recording without feedback loop)

We learned how to autotune our voices in GarageBand this past week and moving on to our last two phases in 2018

  • Phase 3 – Create a StoryBoard for your video
    • Use a Storyboard worksheet to map out your video from beginning to end
    • Look up and save potential images to use with your video
  • Phase 4 – Make a music video utilizing green screen
    • Film in front of the green screen while playing your audio
    • Edit in Final Cut Pro by using “keying” which is a special effect

Check out some students preparing for their videos next week.

 

 

2016-2017 7th Grade Parodies, Plays, & Monologues

It has been an exploratory year in Performance Studies.  We created Humanities Flex classes, so students can have an integrated experience with Performance Studies, Social Studies, and Language Arts.  This year students focused on creating and performing:

  • their Bill of Rights through song parodies with Social Studies,
  • their books through learning “Book-It” style play creation process with Language Arts,
  • their understanding of justice through “Guerilla Theatre” performances,
  • their letters of justice to different governmental bodies through “Justice Monologues” which integrated their understanding of Social Studies and Language Arts.

For Social Studies,  the students learned about the Bill of Rights and then were able to utilize pop culture to name all their amendments in a fun and hip way.  For Language Arts, they read various novels and were able to adapt some lines from the book into a mini-play.  For Guerilla Theatre, they were able to showcase various social justice campaigns through the art of protest in creative ways.  In regards to “Justice Monologues,” some student works were submitted to Drama Notebook, a performance and drama community and resource.  They were able to write a letter to either a politician or a governmental body to express their outrage and anger artistically.  Finally, we always leave room for improvisation, of course!!!

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7th Grade Monologue

 

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Caption: 7th Grade Guerilla Theatre, “Book-It” Performances and Justice Monologues.

7th Grade Performers

Caption: 7th Grade “Book-It” Performance

JUSTICE MONOLOGUES WRITING & PERFORMANCE – 7th Grade Performance Studies

7TH GRADE PERFORMANCE STUDIES

 JUSTICE MONOLOGUES WRITING & PERFORMANCE

 

DUE: Next Week – January 20, 2017 (Mandatory Performances)

(Optional: Also, perform your “Bill of Rights” song, we ran out of time)

QUOTE:

“An Optimist is the human personification of spring” – Susan J. Bissonette

 

DEFINITIONS

Personification is a figure of speech where human qualities are given to animals, objects or ideas. It is the opposite of a metaphor but is very similar. In the arts, personification means representing a non-human thing as if it were human.

Monologue: a long speech by one actor in a play or movie, or as part of a theatrical or broadcast program.

synonyms: soliloquyspeechaddresslecturesermonhomilyformal oration

 

Requirements:

You will create a (200 word minimum and 400 word maximum) monologue where you personify:

  • The constitution,
  • a branch of the government,
  • a policy,
  • an emotion in response to politics
  • or the idea of justice itself

…. and write a letter to it.  You will write it in the form of a script and then perform your “idea of justice.”  You learned about the constitution and recently finished Mock Trial.

Other options:

  1. Choose a piece of the constitution to talk to.  You can talk to one part of the “Bill of Rights” or all of them.  (For example:  Dear Bill of Rights, Dear Constitution, Dear U.S.A., Dear Senator _____, etc.)
  2. Create a Dialogue where you ask and answer your own questions
  3. Monologue where you just ask a series of questions.
  4. See other examples attached or below.

 

EXAMPLE #1

“Mr. President” by PINK

  • Example of a letter written to an actual person and made into a song.  You could replace “Mr. President” with the word “constitution.”  Pink used the “president” as a representative of the constitution
  • The song is an open letter to then President of the United States, George W. Bush. The song criticizes several areas of Bush’s administration and terms in office, including the Iraq WarNo Child Left Behind Act, disapproval of equal rights for homosexuals, lack of empathy for poor and middle class citizens, Bush’s strong religious beliefs, and Bush’s drinking and drug usage in college. Pink felt that it was one of the most important songs she had ever written.
  • Imagine if this was spoken instead of sung.
  • This has 341 Words

 

VIDEO:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6U7vvbDI6c

 

LYRICS:

Dear Mr. President,
Come take a walk with me.
Let’s pretend we’re just two people and
You’re not better than me.
I’d like to ask you some questions if we can speak honestly.

What do you feel when you see all the homeless on the street?
Who do you pray for at night before you go to sleep?
What do you feel when you look in the mirror?
Are you proud?

How do you sleep while the rest of us cry?
How do you dream when a mother has no chance to say goodbye?
How do you walk with your head held high?
Can you even look me in the eye
And tell me why?

Dear Mr. President,
Were you a lonely boy?
Are you a lonely boy?
Are you a lonely boy?
How can you say
No child is left behind?
We’re not dumb and we’re not blind.
They’re all sitting in your cells
While you pave the road to h***.

What kind of father would take his own daughter’s rights away?
And what kind of father might hate his own daughter if she were gay?
I can only imagine what the first lady has to say
You’ve come a long way from whiskey and cocaine.

How do you sleep while the rest of us cry?
How do you dream when a mother has no chance to say goodbye?
How do you walk with your head held high?
Can you even look me in the eye?

Let me tell you ’bout hard work
Minimum wage with a baby on the way
Let me tell you ’bout hard work
Rebuilding your house after the bombs took them away
Let me tell you ’bout hard work
Building a bed out of a cardboard box
Let me tell you ’bout hard work
Hard work
Hard work
You don’t know nothing ’bout hard work
Hard work
Hard work
Oh

How do you sleep at night?
How do you walk with your head held high?
Dear Mr. President,
You’d never take a walk with me.
Would you?

 

EXAMPLE #2 

obama farewell, in parts by adrienne maree brown

January 10, 2017

  • Pop culture References:
    • Darkside = evil in Star Wars
    • Yoda = Sage advisor in Star Wars
    • Eeyore = sad Winnie the Pooh character
      Mariah Carey = diva singer
    • Neil Degrasse Tyson = famous scientist that has a cult following
    • Bae = sweetheart
    • There are many pop icons and movement icons mentioned
    • Lower case usage choice by author was on purpose to break structure; in the tradition that was started by bell hooks and other black feminist educators
    • There are some edits for age appropriateness
  • This letter poem is 475 words
  • Example of a letter to different parts of yourself responding to a political moment.

obama farewell, in parts:

darkside me: i want him to incite rebellions, he is going for super shady.

eeyore me: but what do you say when democracy requires a peaceful transition to an r-kelly costar?

yoda me: listen you must. strategic he is. coherent sentences you may not hear again from this office.

this is the read me: he’s basically reading ******** mump.

organizer me: much respect to people protesting right now #pardonusall

lucious from empire me: he got it all figured out and no one sees it. he gonna let dude play himself out, just watch.

zen me: there are no borders, there is no separation. everything is right.

beyoncé me: flump breaking all these rules, obama should just stay president.

neil degrasse tyson me: science and reason Do matter.

prince me: when you play the future you play yourself.

mariah carey me: ****[stuff] happens.

post-nationalist, post-imperialist me: we are on the death star. the leadership doesn’t change the function.

abolitionist bae me: did he free the political prisoners yet?

black great/grand/daughter me: hush. listen – i can still feel a lineage of pride flowing through me.

clingy me: plus he said final point which reminded me what’s coming (sad face).

detroit voter me: and now he’s like y’all need to vote – that hurts more cuz i’m disenfranchised!

neal degrasse tyson me: wait was that bill nye the science guy?

american citizen me: i do wish it felt like this country he speaks of.

boggs-reader me: you have to love america enough to change it.

james baldwin me: i have said it before, but: I love America more than any other country in the world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.

darkside me: he has come for scump on every single frontline – the force of shade is an art with this one.

organizer me: he told people to organize. (clap clap clap)

beyoncé me: that look he gives michelle. i can’t.

darkside me: hear that shade of melonino?

zen me: you know nothing, relinquish attachment to this experiment.

fearful me: live live live

astrologer me: and just love. the whole mess. right now this love is the force most required in the universe. love directly and without shame. him and each other, there is enough.

me me: but (broken heart).

auntie me: glad he mentioned how malia and sasha nibblings have grown up so beautifully.

beyoncé me: see he is also most proud of parenting. just sayin.

scarface me: biden’s a tough dude.

me me: he looks heartbroken. they all have break-up-but-still-soulmates faces.

eeyore me: where is sasha?

cool teenager me: malia is counting down in her head.

this is the read me: everything after this is basically trash. basura.

zen me: its always what we make of it.

me me: love hurts. exhale.

 

EXAMPLE #3

“a litany for survival” by audre lorde (From Black Unicorn, 1978)

 

  • This poem is 251 words
  • Example: Write a letter to the emotion of the moment. This poem speaks to fear in a historical moment. A litany is a form of prayer.

 

For those of us who live at the shoreline

standing upon the constant edges of decision

crucial and alone

for those of us who cannot indulge

the passing dreams of choice

who love in doorways coming and going

in the hours between dawns

looking inward and outward

at once before and after

seeking a now that can breed

futures

like bread in our children’s mouths

so their dreams will not reflect

the death of ours

 

For those of us

who were imprinted with fear

like a faint line in the center of

our foreheads

learning to be afraid with our mother’s milk

for by this weapon

this illusion of some safety to be found

the heavy-footed hoped to silence us

For all of us

this instant and this triumph

We were never meant to survive.

 

And when the sun rises

we are afraid

it might not remain

when the sun sets we are afraid

it might not rise in the morning

when our stomachs are full we are afraid

of indigestion

when our stomachs are empty we are afraid

we may never eat again

when we are loved we are afraid

love

will vanish

when we are alone we are afraid

love will never return

and when we speak we are afraid

our words will not be heard

nor welcomed

but when we are silent

we are still afraid

 

So it is better to speak

remembering

we were never meant to survive

“PERFORM YOUR RIGHTS” – 7th Grade | “BILL OF RIGHTS” Lesson | PERFORMANCE STUDIES | HUMANITIES FLEX

7th Grade | PERFORMANCE STUDIES | HUMANITIES FLEX

“PERFORM YOUR RIGHTS”

BY THE END OF CLASS!!!! Hand in index card to Ms. Lulu with:

 

  • Blank Side (top left) – Write names
  • Blank Side (middle) – Write 3 group norms & your group roles
  • Lined Side – Write your group choices and plan (1-2 sentences)

TODAY WAS PRACTICE!

NEXT TUESDAY, 11/28/16, PERFORM IN CLASS…. after a 10 minute practice and check in.  Please practice in worklab or scholars’ club.

EXTRA!!! EXTRA!!!!

  • If your group is interested in creating and audio recording and/or a video, please contact Ms. Lulu.  We will find time, because your practices were awesome!!!

STEP #1

      • Identify group roles (here are a few examples)  (Write on index card)
        • Facilitator/Air Time Cop (All voices are heard!)
        • Note-taker (Recording what group members share)
        • Group maintenance extraordinaire (Reading the vibe of the group. How are we doing?)
        • Resource Manager (keeping track of materials, turns in items to teacher)
      • Decide upon and record 3-4 group norms (1 per person) (Write on index card)
        • #1
        • #2
        • #3
        • #4

STEP #2

      • Choose 1 assignment focus (Write on index card)
        • Bill of Rights
        • 1 Amendment (needs to be, more elaborate!)
      • Choose type of performance (Write on index card)
        • Song
        • Poem
        • Dance
        • Combination of above
        • Other: _____________________

SAMPLES for Step #2:

 

  • ConstitutionPOEM

 

Basic Requirements:

        • WRITE & PERFORM A POEM
          • Write a Bill of Rights Poem (3 pages minimum)
          • Performance (optional)
        • PERFORM TO A “BILL OF RIGHTS” SONG
          • Play song alone without visuals
          • Use props similar to video
          • Must Perform!
        • WRITE A WHOLE NEW SONG
          • Find a karaoke version with no vocals
          • Make a song that goes to the beat
          • Write it down and print out a copy for each student
          • Everyone sings-a-long to printed copies!
        • WRITE A SKIT about the “Bill of Rights” or an Amendment
          • Write a Skit
          • Perform it!
        • COMBINATION OF ABOVE (For example: a group decided to start with a skit and put a song in the middle of it)
        • OTHER (make a recommendation to teacher!!!)

DUE NEXT TUESDAY:

      • Presentations (3 minutes minimum and 5 minutes maximum):
        • Don’t have to Perform (unless mentioned above), but someone does have to state what they did and hand out copies or prints if we are doing a sing-along!
        • You will have 10 minutes to practice next Tuesday, but use your time wisely today!

Guerilla Theatre (7th Grade Performance Studies Assignment)

Image of Guerilla Theatre

Guerrilla theatre, generally rendered “guerrilla theater” in the US, is a form of guerrilla communication originated in 1965 by the San Francisco Mime Troupe, who, in spirit of the Che Guevara writings from which the term guerrilla is taken, engaged in performances in public places committed to cultural, social, and political change.   Group performance aimed to shock and surprise, in order to get a message out.

ASSIGNMENT: DUE NEXT WEEK (10/18/16)

See powerpoint here! SEE EXAMPLES!

REQUIREMENTS:

  • ONLY PERFORMING IN CLASS (can perform at Voter’s Rally if you choose)
  • NAME 1 HISTORICAL FACT from Social Studies
  • NAME 1 ISSUE
  • Use 1 prop
  • Use 1 sign
  • Come up with a chant to close the piece to get audience involved
  • Breaking the “Fourth Wall” must be apparent
  • Sign up before you leave if you are working with a team.
  • Need to turn in a SCRIPT next Tuesday.
  • 4 people max
  • 1 minute minimum – 5 minutes max

2015 2016 – 2nd Qtr – 7th Grade Performance Studies Culminating Project Blended Monologues – “Letters to Justice”

2015 2016 – 2nd Qtr – 7th Grade

Performance Studies Culminating Project

Blended Monologues – “Letters to Justice”

*** Note: This was not a professional production.  Only for students to see their performances and grow from their experiences.  The hope is to build upon their performances each year.

CULMINATING PROJECT:
Students were asked to blend their “Letter to Justice” with another student’s letter/monologue. This was the result of that artistic endeavor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

7th Grade Performance Studies focused on reading, writing, and performing monologues. Students exercised their bodies and voices, working on basic theater skills throughout the term through improv exercises, and focused on the theme of “Reflections” and “Mirrors” through writing and performance. Students were shown different methods in which artists represent themselves, their identities, and/or their cultures through performances. Through projects like “Women’s Monologues” and “Letters to Justice,” students learned to use the art of performance to move and provoke an audience, not just entertain, as they grappled with issues raised in their social studies course.

CULMINATION PROJECT

BLEND YOUR “Letter to Justice” MONOLOGUE with another student to create another original piece.

PERSONIFICATION WRITING ASSIGNMENT

(to prepare for “A Conversation with Justice” OR “Letter to Justice” Monologues)

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “An Optimist is the human personification of spring” – Susan J. Bissonette

FOCUS/WORD OF THE WEEK: Personification is a figure of speech where human qualities are given to animals, objects or ideas. It is the opposite of a metaphor but is very similar. In the arts, personification means representing a non-human thing as if it were

“Letter to Justice” or “A conversation with justice” In-Class Assignment

You will create a dialogue or a monologue where you personify the constitution or the idea of justice. You will write it in the form of a script and learn to perform your “idea of justice.” You have been learning about the constitution and recently finished Mock Trial.

Sometimes the law is tricky and people are always asking “what is fair or not fair?” or “what is just or not just?” We have talked about monologues and how they are conversations you have on stage by yourself that are directed towards an audience.

1. Choose a piece of the constitution to talk to. You can talk to one part of the “Bill of Rights” or all of them. (For example: Dear Bill of Rights, Dear Constitution, Dear U.S.A., Dear Senator _____, etc.)

2. You can choose to create a Dialogue where you ask and answer your own questions or a Monologue where you just ask a series of questions.

Example:

a. Monologue – “Bill of Rights why are you so smart? Why do you always remind us of what is right and wrong? Do you get tired of reminding us of the foundation?”

b. Dialogue w/ self and personified object  – I asked, “Bill of Rights why are you smart?” The Bill of Rights responded to me, “I need to be, because people are born not knowing the difference between right and wrong. We need a compass to guide and remind us.” “Then why are they attempting to take you away?” I countered.

3. You will be creating this into a performance. We will work on this on Thursday. The first step is to choose what or “who” you would like to be in “dialogue” with. (For example: A lot of people are writing letters to people running for public office like Donald Trump. You can also choose a policy that you don’t agree with that is in the news where someone’s rights are being taken away)

4. Write 1-2 pages double spaced OR 130 word count (use Microsoft word counter)

5. Think about how words can create images and what motions would you give to the words you are writing.

6. Be creative and check in with your teacher(s) for advice if you are stuck

EXAMPLE shown in class:

“Mr. President” by PINK

 This is a great example of a letter written to an actual person. You could replace “Mr. President” with the word “constitution.” Pink used the “president” as a representative of the constitution or

 The song is an open letter to then President of the United States, George W. Bush. The song criticizes several areas of Bush’s administration and terms in office, including the Iraq War, No Child Left Behind Act, disapproval of equal rights for homosexuals, lack of empathy for poor and middle class citizens, Bush’s strong religious beliefs, and Bush’s drinking and drug usage in college. Pink felt that it was one of the most important songs she had ever written.

 Imagine if this was spoken instead of sung.

LYRICS

Dear Mr. President,

Come take a walk with me.

Let’s pretend we’re just two people and

You’re not better than me.

I’d like to ask you some questions if we can speak honestly.

What do you feel when you see all the homeless on the street?

Who do you pray for at night before you go to sleep?

What do you feel when you look in the mirror?

Are you proud?

How do you sleep while the rest of us cry?

How do you dream when a mother has no chance to say goodbye?

How do you walk with your head held high?

Can you even look me in the eye

And tell me why?

Dear Mr. President,

Were you a lonely boy?

Are you a lonely boy?

Are you a lonely boy?

How can you say

No child is left behind?

We’re not dumb and we’re not blind.

They’re all sitting in your cells

While you pave the road to hell.

What kind of father would take his own daughter’s rights away?

And what kind of father might hate his own daughter if she were gay?

I can only imagine what the first lady has to say

You’ve come a long way from whiskey and cocaine.

How do you sleep while the rest of us cry?

How do you dream when a mother has no chance to say goodbye?

How do you walk with your head held high?

Can you even look me in the eye?

Let me tell you ’bout hard work

Minimum wage with a baby on the way

Let me tell you ’bout hard work

Rebuilding your house after the bombs took them away

Let me tell you ’bout hard work

Building a bed out of a cardboard box

Let me tell you ’bout hard work

You don’t know nothing ’bout hard work

How do you sleep at night?

How do you walk with your head held high?

Dear Mr. President,

You’d never take a walk with me.

Would you?

Dåkot-ta came to Performance Studies 7th Grade!

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Dåkot-ta Alcantara-Camacho came to visit Seattle Girls School! They went to two 7th grade Performance Studies classes and taught students chants, songs, dances, and about traveling around the world to teach and preserve Guåhan Marianas Islands culture. 

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They stated, “They travel the world sharing multi-disciplinary New Chamorro Performance and workshops to empower creativity, community activation, and inter-cultural solidarity.” Dåkot-ta was born  and raised in the “Coast Salish Territories of Washington State,” Infinite Dåkot-ta, which is their artist names, descends from a heritage of Ilokano and Matao lineage from Ilokas Philippines and Guåhan Marianas Islands.

Dåkot-ta  came to SGS with a decade of performing and teaching experience, they have “worked with artists and facilitated workshops in public/private schools, universities, community organizations, and arts festivals across the world.”

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Please enjoy these amazing photos taken from our community meeting by Leslie where students shared their chants and dances that they learned.  Thank you to SGS students for supporting the preservation of island cultures and making visible the work of performance artists cultivating culture.

Find out more information here: 
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Welcome to SGS Performance Studies 2015-2016! Let the show begin!

 flying person ps officeGreetings SGS universe!

Performance Studies is under way and here is an outline of the wonder and “wild” in store for us all.  The picture to the left has some of the stage props from the “basket of magic” we use for improv.  Below  is a picture of 6th Grade Block A during a spontaneous photo shoot after we completed all of our work in class!  All the students created their characters and “wardrobes” in less than 3 minutes.  Below that is a demonstration of how to use the “talking stick.”  All our students have wild imaginations ready to create art & performances at the “drop of a hat.” The past two weeks has been an amazing “warm-up” to a semester that will be filled with activities, improv, journal reflections, and most importantly utilizing the imagination to create a powerful sense of self and community.  Learn more below!

6th grad block A - BLOG

PEOPLE SAY….

5th grade talking stickPERFORMANCE STUDIES is the academic field concerned with the study of performance in any of its various forms. The term ‘performance’ is broad, and can include artistic and aesthetic performances like concerts, theatrical events, and performance art; sporting events; social, political and religious events like rituals, ceremonies, proclamations and public decisions; certain kinds of language use; and those components of identity which require someone to do, rather than just be, something. Consequently, performance studies is interdisciplinary, drawing from theories of the performing arts, anthropology and sociology, literary theory, and legal studies.

MS.LULU’s SAYS…

  • BRINGING THE IMAGINATION INTO REAL LIFE
  • CHALLENGING INJUSTICE
  • CREATING NEW TRANSFORMATIVE PLAY
  • CREATING CULTURE aka CULTURAL PRODUCTION
  • SUPPORTING EACH OTHER IN HAVING THEIR VOICES HEARD
  • ALLOWING PEOPLE TO TELL THEIR STORY THROUGH ART
  • HELPING OTHERS SEE THE WORLD THROUGH DIFFERENT LENS
  • SHARING “TRUTH” IN FUN & CREATIVE WAYS
  • BUILDING COMMUNITY & A NEW WORLD
  • & MORE

As the trimester moves forward, each student and class will develop more “working definitions” to define what performance studies is and can be in the future.  

5th & 6th 1st TRIMESTER FOCUS

  • VOICE – Finding individual voice while honoring & making room for all voices
  • BODY – Naming your body language and how you want your body to move on stage and in your world(s)
  • STORIES  – Story of YOU, Story of ME, Story of US – Telling your story creatively & listen w/ openness to others to discover themes of connection
  • CURIOSITY – Exhibiting wonder & curiosity to support each other in being their full and honest selves
  • CREATE CULTURE  – Creating more than just a performance, we are naming and creating space within classroom, homes, schools, and the world

TRIMESTER  OVERVIEW

5th Grade will be focusing on “Alter Egos” that represent their “braver” selves.  They will tell stories about

6th Grade (block A & B) will be focusing on playing with and performing with “MIRRORS OF THEMSELVES”

THE FOLLOWING WEEKS ARE SPLIT INTO 4 ACTS (approximately 3 weeks each).  I chose the four main elements of life EARTH, AIR, WATER, & FIRE to represent the different elements of “selves” that can be found in nature.  We are moving from grounding ourselves in the present reality (EARTH), drifting into dreams and visions (AIR), delving deeper into emotions and balance (WATER), and then we will move into full presence and passion (FIRE).

ACT 1 – EARTH  – Scenes/Week 2, 3, 4

  • Introduction
  • Story & Dream Creation
  • Futurism: Design, Map, Develop a production
  • Playing with Voices

ACT 2 – AIR – Scenes/Week 5, 6, 7

  • BUILDING CLOUDS: DREAMS IN REALITY
  • STORIES TO OUR FUTURE SELVES: MOVEMENT w/ Voice

ACT 3 – WATER

Scenes/Week 8, 9, 10

  • Everyone is fluid: Moving with change & transition
  • Productions Assignments: Everyone has a role
  • Blending

FINAL ACT – FIRE

Final Scene – Week 11

  • Practice, Practice, Practice

CULMINATING PEFORMANCE

Date & Time TBD – Performances to be decided per class, but will be on same day each trimester.  The Options are as wide as the sea and will be utilizing multi-media.

EXTRA ACTS:

  • There are opportunities for community performances that will be age appropriate that will be announced throughout trimester.
  • These are opportunities for you to attend with your classmates and/or families.
  • More information to come

More about MS.LULU:

Luzviminda Uzuri “Lulu” Carpenter (aka Ms. Lulu) is a Resident Artist and Performance Studies Teacher.  She is a performance artist, producer, promoter, consultant, and community organizer and comes to SGS as a cultural worker & cultural strategist who utilizes art and education to prevent violence with youth, young adults, and other marginalized communities.  She integrates the ideas of somatics (body), voice, art, performance, radio, and media justice through building curriculum and practices to empower students to take ownership and (re)create their image. She has worked and performed for over 10 years in Seattle with community organizations, such as Ladies First Project of Communities Against Rape and Abuse (CARA), VoicesRising, Asian Pacific Islander Women and Family Safety Center (now APIChaya), Pinay sa Seattle (now GABRIELA-Seattle).  Currently, she is an ambassador for OnTheBoards (OTB), to make connections between community, social justice, and innovative art and performances.  Ms. Lulu is also a Commissioner with the City of Seattle LGBT Commission and works as a consultant at Roots Young Adult Shelter when she is not performing on stage, on radio, or in a middle school classroom.

Some examples of her local productions and promotions are Hollow Earth Radio (HER) with #LuluNation + #SadBoisHypeClub, Climbing PoeTree’s “Hurricane Season” (2008),OuterSpaces Tour: Power in the Margins (2012), Annual Women Who Rock Community & (Un) Conference (2011-2015), Complex Movements (2014-2015), Cultural Congress: Arts & Social Change Symposium (2013-2015), HaaayFest (2012-2014), and other one-act plays and featured poetry performances.  Some examples of media include: PechaKucha Seattle: #BlackLivesMatter “Examining Identity in the 21st Century,” KCTS9 “Speaking History: StoryCorps Visits Seattle,” Women Who Rock Community Archives, World Radio Day, and working on Low Power FM (LPFM) community radios in the Central District & Seattle (Articles: Stranger & Seattle Times).